Jul
2002

A second-generation blood substitute (perflubron emulsion) increases the blood solubility of modern volatile anesthetics in vitro.

Cuignet OY, Baele PM, Van Obbergh LJ
Anesth Analg 2002;95(2):368-372.
NATA Rating :
Review by : Hardy JF*, Van der Linden P**
NATA Review
This article describes the blood solubility of isoflurane, sevoflurane and desflurane in blood containing increasing concentrations of Perflubron emulsion (within the expected clinical concentration and twice that). While the blood/gas partition coefficient increased for all anesthetics, the clinical effect is expected to be minimal since the perfluorochemicals will be present in very small concentrations, even at maximal dosing. In summary, the study is interesting from a mechanistic perspective but has little or no clinical relevance.

– J.-F. Hardy

This in vitro study demonstrates that the presence of perfluorocarbons in the bloodstream increases the amount of volatile anesthetic agent carried, but does not really change the solubility in blood of these agents. Further studies are needed to to assess whether perfluorocarbon emulsions will affect the pharmacokinetics of volatile anesthetics in vivo.

– P. Van der Linden